Sunday, July 23, 2006

Shrapnel and splinters

There seems to be some confusion over two individual types of metal used in bombs to cause personnel casualties.

Bombs kill in any number of ways. One is concussion. The shock wave of a bomb destroys things, including flesh. Another is from splinters. The torn metal casing of the bomb deconstructs in the blast to make splinters. These metal splinters are of varying size and often do horrific damage by cutting and tearing as they fly through the air. Shrapnel is little metal balls that are included in the casing to add an increased volume of metal. They fly outward with the spinters from the metal casing, increasing the lethality of the bomb.



This picture shows the difference between splinter and shrapnel. They were found as part of the detrius of a Katyusha rocket fired by Hizbollah into Israel. This photo demonstrates the difference between shrapnel and splinter. The shrapnel are the little metal balls. The splinters are the jagged metal obects.

Either could be used against personnel or equipment. However, Hizbollah is using shrapnel in the Katyusha, an area weapon. These rockets are not being fired at military targets. They are being fired almost exclusively at cities to terrify and harrass.

Hat tip to LGF.

2 comments:

Rivrdog said...

There was a report from the city of Haifa that said that the little ball bearings are characteristic of the Type-802 battlefield missile, NOT the Katusha barrage rocket.

That's how they first determined what had hit the railway station.

The Type-802s, a Chinese missile with good accuracy (a guided missile) is apparently being shot from crowded neighborhoods in the Beirut area, with Shizbully daring the IDF to bomb those neighboorhoods.

Mushy said...

Good information!

I brought back some VC rocket sharpnel in 35mm film cansters and have since lost them - dang.

In order to evade Puff (mini-gun DC-3) they would touch off as many as 50 at once and hightail it out of the area. You would hear maybe 2 or 3 hits, but count 50 holes later.